Military Games Attract the Masses

Call of Duty Black OpsBy Keith A. Webster Jr.

Do the names Call of Duty, Splinter Cell, or Ghost Recon ring a bell? All three of these games have one thing in common: military action. These games have been modernized and are becoming more popular as the years continue to move forward.

According to Corey Mead’s study of War Play, military games attract the life of the soldier in computerized combat. War Play explains the usage of government actions and have led society in education, from GPS and jet engines, to distant education as well as vocational learning.

The interesting fact about military games is that they have been in existence since 1960. Spacewar! was the first game created by graduate students from MIT who were funded by the Pentagon. In 1980, the first-person shooter Battlezone was created which made success in the game industry, which led to the infamous 3D shooter Doom in the 1990s. The reason why Doom was so successful was because it provided multiplayer interacting and its virtual reality based training.

As we witness wars rage on in modern society, the need for young soldiers continues to increase. This is how the military was able to attract the young generation. However, the downside of recruiting soldiers was the rise of psychological disorders such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). A simulator called Virtual Afghanistan helps soldiers confront traumatic events in a process called exposure therapy. This allows soldiers to rehabilitate their emotions and memories, and also gain an outlook from role-playing different characters.

Although improving the lifestyle of an American soldier is profound, the idea of becoming a soldier is reflected through military games. As these games continue to win fans, the gaming industry will always have a source to provide insight to various soldier scenarios. One thing is clear, the government will not stop recruiting soldiers.

However, the likelihood of military video games not being produced will not be a factor as long as it keeps its gamers entertained and satisfied.

 

About the Author

Keith WebsterKeith Webster earned a Master’s of Science degree from the University of Tampa in 2014. He has also studied to become an Instructional Designer as a graduate student as well as a professional in the workplace. Webster has completed multiple projects involving the use of instructional strategies that are involved in the learning process of academic learning in higher education and non-profit organizations.
Currently, he is involved in the creation of an online web game with a group of game developers, and has high hopes of obtaining overall knowledge of the gaming industry and its components, including script writing, game design using 2D and 3D animation, logo branding, and other important tools for game development.